What is Beta: Explanation Types, and Example

What is Beta and How Does It Work? Beta, often denoted as β, is a measure of a stock's sensitivity to market movements. It quantifies the stock's volatility relative to a benchmark index, typically the overall market, like the S&P 500 or DJIA. In simple terms, beta helps investors assess how much a particular stock […]

September 25, 2023
Meta Matt

What is Beta and How Does It Work?

Beta, often denoted as β, is a measure of a stock's sensitivity to market movements. It quantifies the stock's volatility relative to a benchmark index, typically the overall market, like the S&P 500 or DJIA. In simple terms, beta helps investors assess how much a particular stock tends to move concerning the broader market.

Terms that you need to know

S&P 500 Index: It is a stock market index that tracks the largest publicly listed 500 companies in the USA.

DJIA: Dow Jones Industrial Average is a stock market index that tracks 30 large blue-chip stocks listed on the NYSE and NASDAQ.

Volatility: The volatility of a stock represents the speed at which its price changes over a specified period.

Key Takeaways

  • Beta simply measures how volatile a stock is by comparing it with the volatility of the overall market.
  • It is always relative to some benchmark. It cannot relay any information about a stock without a suitable benchmark.
  • A stock with a beta greater than 1 is considered more volatile than the market.
  • A stock with a beta less than 1 is deemed less volatile.
  • A beta equal to 1 indicates that the stock's price movements closely mirror those of the market.
  • Beta can help quantify a stock's volatility so that you can understand the risk of investing in that stock.
  • Beta can represent historical volatility but cannot predict how a stock will act in the future.
Beta definition

Calculation of a Stock's Beta

Calculating beta involves a straightforward formula:

In steps, the calculation involves:

  • Calculate the returns of the stock and the market over a specific period.
  • Calculate the average return for both the stock and the market.
  • Find the covariance between the stock's returns and the market's returns.
  • Find the variance of the market's returns.
  • Divide the covariance by the variance to obtain the beta value.

Using Beta Values

Here's a closer look at how to use beta effectively:

Selecting a Benchmark: To use beta, you need a benchmark against which you'll compare the stock's performance. The benchmark is typically a well-known market index, such as the S&P 500 for U.S. stocks. The market index represents the overall market's performance.

Interpreting Beta Values:

  • Beta of 1.0: A stock with a beta of 1.0 is expected to move in line with the market. If the market goes up by 1%, the stock should also rise by 1%, and if the market falls by 1%, the stock should fall by 1%.
  • Beta Greater Than 1.0: A beta greater than 1.0 indicates that the stock is more volatile than the market. For instance, a beta of 1.5 means that the stock is expected to move 50% more than the market. If the market goes up by 1%, the stock is expected to rise by 1.5%, and vice versa. High-beta stocks offer the potential for higher returns but come with higher risk.
  • Beta Less Than 1.0: A beta less than 1.0 suggests that the stock is less volatile than the market. A beta of 0.5, for example, means that the stock is expected to move only half as much as the market. If the market goes up by 1%, the stock is expected to rise by only 0.5%. Low-beta stocks are more stable but may offer lower returns.
  • Negative Beta: A negative beta indicates an inverse relationship with the market. This means that when the market goes up, the stock tends to go down, and vice versa. Stocks with negative beta values are considered defensive and may offer stability during market downturns.

Using Beta in Investment Strategy

Now that you understand how you can calculate a stock's beta and how to use its value to assess a stock's volatility, the next step is to use this value in your investment strategy. For that, you need the read the next section.

Portfolio Diversification: Beta can be a valuable tool for diversifying your investment portfolio. By combining stocks with different beta values, you can achieve a balanced portfolio that is less susceptible to market volatility. For example, if you hold a high-beta stock, you might consider adding low-beta stocks to reduce overall portfolio risk.

Also Read: Asset Allocation: Definition, Importance, and Strategies

Risk Assessment: Beta can help investors assess the risk associated with a particular stock. High-beta stocks are riskier but may offer higher returns, while low-beta stocks are less risky but may have lower potential returns. Investors should align their risk tolerance with the beta of the stocks they choose to invest in.

Time Horizon: Consider your investment time horizon when using beta. If you have a long-term investment horizon, you may be more willing to tolerate the short-term volatility associated with high-beta stocks.

Pros and Cons of Beta

Pros:

  • Beta provides a quick assessment of a stock's historical volatility.
  • It helps investors understand how a stock might react to market fluctuations.
  • Beta can be used to diversify a portfolio by choosing stocks with different beta values.

Cons:

  • Beta is based on historical data and may not accurately predict future performance.
  • It doesn't account for other important factors like company fundamentals.
  • Beta can be misleading for stocks with limited historical data.

Stock Beta Examples

Let's look at a few examples:

Apple Inc. (AAPL): Beta of around 1.14, indicating slightly higher volatility compared to the market.

Johnson & Johnson (JNJ): Beta of around 0.67, signifying lower volatility than the market.

Tesla, Inc. (TSLA): Beta of approximately 1.97, indicating significantly higher volatility than the market.

Conclusion

Beta is a valuable tool for investors to assess a stock's volatility and risk relative to the broader market. Understanding beta types and calculations can aid in making more informed investment decisions. However, it's essential to remember that beta has limitations and should be used alongside other financial metrics to form a comprehensive investment strategy.



Get Our Trade Alerts In Real Time

Get crypto education, live streams, real time trade alerts, exclusive NFT deals, and more.


YOU MAY ALSO LIKE

Get Our Weekly Watchlist

Get the latest market news, stocks to watch, earning reports, exclusive discounts and more!
PennyBois
PennyBois

PennyBois is a group of experienced traders dedicated to providing hedge fund quality trade alerts without the cost.